The theory of early migration to the americas

Evidence for competing theories continues to change the ways we understand our prehistoric roots. While evidence of animal migration is more solidified, the human story may be more complicated. As ofgenetic findings suggest that a single population of modern humans migrated from southern Siberia toward the land mass known as the Bering Land Bridge as early as 30, years ago, and crossed over to the Americas by 16, years ago.

The theory of early migration to the americas

Sitka In reconstructing the ancient Beringian environment, the researchers provided a new clue that could help explain this discrepancy. Such an ecosystem, the authors argue, would have been an ideal place for humans to live. Now, more evidence for the idea comes from a seemingly unlikely source: Sicoli and Holton sought to go a step further: Most often, phylogenetics refers to sorting out the evolutionary relationships between different organisms, using genetic similarities and differences to construct an accurate family tree of species.

The theory of early migration to the americas

But because languages, like life, gradually evolve over time, linguists have put the same sort of analysis to work in constructing language trees. Their tree confirmed that Yenesian and Na-Dene are related—and that Haida is not—but because these languages were carried by populations of humans that were moving over time, the lengths of branches in the tree also allowed Sicoli and Horton to weigh the odds of two different migration hypotheses.

The second held that the source was in Beringia itself, with subsets of its speakers fanning out over both Siberia and North America. Thus, the land bridge was a dead end, potentially explaining why these ancient migrants could have spent about 10, years in Beringia.

Other Migration Theories - Bering Land Bridge National Preserve (U.S. National Park Service)

Then, about 17, years ago, the glaciers began to recede—and sea levels began to rise—providing two reasons to leave Beringia, either for new territory in Alaska or back toward Siberia. A time lapse shows how glaciers white blocked the path to North America until about 17, years ago, and rising sea levels cut off the land bridge about 10, years ago.And with ice covering much of Alaska, the ancestors of Native Americans needn't have just strolled through Beringia, they suggested—they could have lived there for about 10, years before moving on.

Now, more evidence for the idea comes from a seemingly unlikely source: languages still spoken in Asia and North America today. A new study has challenged the popular theory that the first Ice-Age humans who migrated to North America arrived by a land bridge connecting Siberia to Alaska. Ancient Migration Patterns to North America Are Hidden in Languages Spoken Today Languages spoken in North America and Siberia are distantly related.

In ancient boulders, new clues about the story of human migration to the Americas Geologic evidence supports a coastal theory of early settlement Date: May 30, Source: University at Buffalo Summary: A geological study provides compelling evidence to support the hypothesis that ancient humans migrated into the Americas via a .

The theory of early migration to the americas

Understand other theories of migration such as the Atlantic Theory and Oceania Theory Realize that people were in the Americas long before European explorers To unlock this lesson you must be a. University at Buffalo. "In ancient boulders, new clues about the story of human migration to the Americas: Geologic evidence supports a coastal theory of early settlement." ScienceDaily.

Settlement of the Americas - Wikipedia